Animals

30 Days of Thanks – Day 27

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Working at a dog day care.  It's not for the weak.
Working at a dog day care. It’s not for the weak.

I was able to spend the day with Hubby at his job, managing a dog day care. Whew! It was exhausting, but worthwhile work, watching dogs of all ages, sizes and play styles interact with each other.  For some reason, I thought working with animals would be easier than working with children.  In some respects it was, but in many more, it was not.  Dogs cannot tell you if they are hurt or why they may be sad.  Two dogs that may be playing happily with each other, may, all of a sudden, become aggressive and the people have to be vigilant for any signs of behavior changes.  Hubby has the right instinct for this type of work.  I do not.  It has been an interesting day and I am ready to see my K9 pack of three.

30 Days of Thanks – Day 22

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Zeke Fall 2013
Zeke, 12-year-old Black Lab and Greyhound mix, enjoying the Florida sunshine.

Our friend Teresa recommended Live Oak Veterinary Hospital when we brought Zeke home. Her Doberman, Gracie, had been a patient there her entire life and loved the staff. For 12 years, they have taken care of our pack and love our pets as much as we do. Thank you Live Oak for being committed to serving your patients with personal, professional and compassionate care.

Mother’s Day and Childfree People

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day 1 motorcycle classI originally published this post two years ago, but I liked it and thought it was worth another look.   My friends who are mothers have declared me a “Dog Mom,”  which I suspect is one step closer to Crazy Dog Lady – a moniker I fully embrace.   

Hubby and I do not have children.  Why, or how, is no one’s business and not subject for a public forum.  Suffice it to say, that in our mid-40s, we are not planning to start a family, as our family is complete.

This brings me to the awkwardness of Mother’s Day, and the exploitation….er, “celebration,” of motherhood.  It has become a slippery slope like wishing someone “Happy Holidays.”   My response when someone wishes me a happy anything, is to say, “thank you.”   I don’t care to have a long, drawn out discussion of religion, philosophy, end-of-days, heaven, hell, bunions, facial hair, acne or explosive diarrhea.   Although, as a Nursing Student I have an unnatural fascination with bowel movements.  They are magical!

Happy Mother's Day TootMore awkward than wishing someone a “Happy Mother’s Day,” is the “do you have children” question.  When I answer, “no,” there are two reactions.  The cover-up “oh,” followed by uneasy silence, or the probing “why not?”   My typical response is to shrug my shoulders and stare at the person, because saying “none of your damned business,” seems unnecessarily harsh.  And, it really is NONE of their business, so I don’t engage in conversation about it.  I simply don’t care to hear their thoughts about my personal life.  Ironically, the people who are most likely to ask, or make unsolicited comments, are those least closest to me.  Interesting.

Many of us mentor others throughout our lives.  In my case, there are several women whom I have advised during incredibly difficult experiences in their lives.  I was the “adult” they turned to for support and advice.  They chose me, for their own personal reasons and I was honored to be their shoulder to cry on or first person to celebrate with.  Did that make me a mother? <shoulder shrug>

Which brings me to Mother’s Day.  What do you say to single fathers, grandparents raising their grandchildren, foster parents, gay dads, siblings raising other siblings?   I still struggle with this.

However, in honor of the “holiday,”  I wish EVERYONE who is mother, or serves in the role of a mother a happy day.  May you be celebrated for your personal contributions to forming the next generation by being acknowledged for being YOU.  (Free meals, coffee and gift certificates are also nice, people.)