Millenials

Hermione Without Ron? Say It Ain’t So, J.K.

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ron and hermioneIn teaser quotes from an interiew with Emma Watson, guest editor at Wonderland Magazine, J.K. Rowling admits to having wanted Hermione Granger to end up with Harry Potter, not Ron Weasley.  (The issue will be available on Thursday.)

WHAT?!

As I read each book and the characters grew older, I found the pairing of Hermione and Ron to be inspired.   As the primary character, Harry, was the obvious (boring) choice as leading man.   I will admit to having imagined the two of them ending up together, but as the story progressed, the more compelling relationship was between Hermione and Ron.

It was a classic “opposites attract” story, imbedded in the “friends-to-lovers” theme.   Ron allowed Hermione to let her hair down, have fun and relax her natural intensity, while Hermione’s confidence in Ron empowered him to grow up, and into his own man.  It also allowed a ginger to be the romantic hero.  Genius!

I thank whatever literary gods and the Universe for ensuring that Ms. Rowling, not only kept Ron alive, but made him into an awkward, albeit truly lovable, romantic hero.   It was one of many different plot twists that made this series on of my favorites.

How do you feel about these new revelations?

El Bachelor.

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Rosas para las bachelorettes de Juan Pablo.
Rosas para las bachelorettes de Juan Pablo.

I have been a reality TV connoisseur since the first season of The Real World aired on MTV in 1992.  Additionally, I avidly watched dating game shows like “Love Connection,” “The Dating Game,” and my all-time, these-couples-will-need-family-therapy-after-the-show-airs favorite, “The Newlywed Game.”  If I see a Millionaire Matchmaker or Tough Love marathon on, I will make time to watch Patti and Steve deliver their stern, yet sage dating advice, to clueless women and men.

While I gravitate towards shows that focus on the cast’s talent, like So You Think You Can DanceProject Runway, The Sing Off and The Voice, big personalities like the ladies of Double DivasDance Moms, and this season’s little gem, Kim of Queens, which follows a former pageant queen as she molds girls into pageant winners, are always worth a look-see.

Working out with a trainer for TV shows.
Working out with a trainer for TV shows.

When the first season of “The Bachelor” aired, I watched it, but never became a fan.   Even when “The Bachelorette” spun off, I was not sold on the idea of “dating” 25 people in the bubble of reality TV.   However, a few of my die-hard “Bachelor” friends started commenting on the last season of “The Bachelorette,” starring Desiree Hartsock.   They really liked Desiree, and after following a few of their Facebook chats, I was intrigued enough that I started watching.   I also became invested in Desiree and hoped she would find a man who genuinely cared for her.  She did!  Together with beau Chris Siegfried, they celebrated their first New Year’s Eve together.

As we watched Desiree “date” the preselected hunks, one man stood out from the pack.  His name was Juan Pablo Galavis, the soccer-playing, single dad with the sexy Venezuelan accent.  Desiree may not have been attracted to Juan Pablo, but America was!  And so was I!  ¡Ay papacito!

ABC listened!  When they announced the next “Bachelor” would be Juan Pablo, people went crazy.  My middle-aged, happily married self, included.  Juan Pablo came across as a nice man, in a hunky package.  He was devoted to his daughter, Camila Valentina, who was born on Valentine’s Day, and remained friendly with Camila’s mother.   In other words, he was Central Casting directors’ wet dream.   The pre-show buzz included the special, The Bachelor: Countdown to Juan Pablo.  I watched it as research to prepare for the actual show.    Mmmmm.

El Bachelor!
El Bachelor!

The first show aired last night and Juan Pablo (and America) met the contestants vying for a rose.  ABC did not disappoint.  There were the requisite beautiful, intelligent, accomplished women, who should be able to find long-term relationship partners, and there were the “unique” women.  Some may categorize them as unconventional, quirky, socially awkward, overly emotional, but I like to call them reality TV “money.”   Let’s face it, no one watches reality TV to see normal, balanced, happy people.  We like our train wrecks, thank you very much.  Providing last night’s entertainment were Shoeless Lucy, Creepy Massage Therapist Amy J.,  Bicycle Piano Player Lauren S., Mineral Coordinator and What-Not-to-Share-on-a-Date-Queen Lauren.  Uninterested, Possibly Jetlagged, Opera Singer Sharleen  received the first rose, but did not look as if she wanted to accept it.  Ah, must see TV.

I will be pulling for Florida girl and single mom, Renee, Prosecutor Andi, and Pediatric Nurse Nikki.  And, of course, drunk girl drama, which seems to be a staple of “The Bachelor” franchise.  Popcorn, at the ready.

Cue the theme song for “El Bachelor” which could be Juan Pablo’s Lucha Libre alter ego, if he is unable to find love.

I live tweet during TV shows using Get Glue, if you would like to join the party!

The 10 Reasons Why Generation-Y is Soft

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Please read this article then come back and share your thoughts – The 10 Reasons Why Generation-Y is Soft

I hoped this article, written by a member of Generation-Y, would spark a heated discussion, on his site.  Unfortunately, it created a forum for people to question his facts, but not offer any alternative thoughts.   Sadly, I suspect it will continue to degenerate into a list of “I know you are, but what am I,”  “you’re WRONG,” or “______ you” comments, so I brought the discussion over here, so we could delve into it with a little more in depth.

Source: ARMA International
Source: ARMA International

In the interest of full disclosure, I am a member of Generation X.  I received extensive human resources training in generational differences in the workplace, but I am a product of my generation and it certainly impacts by world view.  I identify with many of the characteristics ascribed to my generation: independent, due to being a latch key kid; suspicious and mistrusting of companies/corporations, after seeing many of my friends’ parents lose their jobs in the 1980s and 1990s; comfortable in a diverse workplace (and world), and place a great emphasis on work/life balance.  I work to live, not live to work.  I am also aware that we are not one of the larger generations (population-wise).   I graduated college in 1991 and in the mid-1990s returned to advise a couple of student organizations, at the same university, as a volunteer.

For the past eight years, I have noticed a growing disconnect with the students.   I knew I was “aging out,” or identifying more with their parents, than the students themselves.   Every year I felt as if we were growing apart, even though I tried to keep up with their cultural trends and interests.  This year, however, the gap became too great.  I knew it was time to move on, when my patience dwindled to nothing.

One of the minor reasons I stopped advising college students, was that I felt they were too “fragile.”  The women I worked with directly, learned quickly, that I never minced words.  To some, it was a rude awakening.   Some rose to the occasion immediately upon being treated as an adult.  Others did not, and discovered the “joys” of personal accountability, or cleaning up one’s messes.   I may have been the adviser, but ultimately, they were responsible for decisions made.   Time after time, I was impressed by these women, but they seemed to be the exception, not the norm.

When I read Eddie Cuffin’s article it resonated with me, because it hit upon many of the things I witnessed, not the least of which was a delayed emotional maturity.   At that moment, I knew my “honesty is the best policy”….well, brutal honesty, in my case, would not work with the newest generation and it was an opportunity for someone else to take my place.  I was also exhausted of being “misinterpreted,”  “translated” or worse, “watered-down” to make my words less harsh to delicate Generation-Y egos.   So, I moved on, but left with a sense that there was unfinished business and that I never really understood the newest 18-20-year-olds.

Generation-Y followers, do any of the ideas brought forth in this article resonate with you?  What about my Generation X and Baby Boomer followers, what have you observed?   Please share!